June 2019 Preview

Starting summer off right with journal articles! This month we get back into a discussion of ethical dilemmas with the use of telehealth and telemedicine before inviting Dr. Stacie Bancroft to share some advance chaining variations. Finally, while we all enjoy some time off, a look back into the archives with our classic episode on research related to virtual reality. Bonus: Rob’s award-winning writings are only marginally embarrassing to hear about.

Articles for June 2019

Episode 88 - Ethics of Telehealth

Peterson, S.M., Woodward, J., Crane, J,, & Garner, M. (2009). Teleconsultaiton in school settings: Linking classroom teachers and behavior analysts through web-based technology. Behavior Analysis in Practice,, 2, 32-39. doi: 10.1007/BF03391746

Machalicek, W., Lequia, J., Pinkelman, S., Knowles, C., Raulston, T., Davis, T., & Alresheed, F. (2016). Behavioral teleheatlh consultation with families of children with autism spectrum disorder. Behavioral Interventions, 31, 223-250. doi: 10.1002/bin.1450

Kaplan, B. & Litewka, S. (2008). Ethical challenges of telemedicine and telehealth. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, 17, 401-416. doi: 10.1017/S0963180108080535

Hall, J.L. & McGraw, D. (2014). For telehealth to succeed, privacy and security risks must be identified and addressed. Health Affairs, 33, 216-221. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0997

Episode 89 - Next-Level Chaining w/ Dr. Stacie Bancroft

Bancroft, S.L., Weiss, J.S., Libby, M.E., & Ahearn, W.H. (2011). A comparison of procedural variations in teaching behavior chains: Manual guidance, trainer completion, and no completion of untrained steps. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 559-569. doi: 10.1901/jaba.2011.44-559

Slocum, S.K. & Tiger, J.H. (2011). An assessment of the efficiency of and child preference for forward and backward chaining. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 793-805. doi: 10.1901/jaba.2011.44-793

Lambert, J.M., Copeland, B.A., Karp, E.L., Finley, C.I., .Houchins-Juarez, N.J., & Ledford, J.R. (2016). Chaining functional basketball sequences (with embedded conditional discriminations) in an adolescent with autism. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 199-210. doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0125-0

(REBROADCAST) Episode 25 - Virtual Reality

Bouchard, S., Cote, S., St-Jacques, J., Robillard, G., & Renaud, P.   (2006).  Effectiveness of virtual reality exposure in the treatment of arachnophobia using 3D games.  Technology and Health Care, 14, 19-27.  

Padgett, L.S., Strickland, D., & Coles, C.D.  (2006).  Case study: Using a virtual reality computer game to teach fire safety skills to children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome.  Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 31, 65-70.  doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsj030

Morina, N., Ijntema, H., Meyerbroker, K., & Emmelkamp, P.M.G.  (2015).  Can virtual reality exposure therapy gains be generalized to real-life? A meta-analysis of studies applying behavioral assessments.  Behaviour Research and Therapy, 74.  18-24.  doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2015.08.010

Episode 71 - (ETHICS) Cultural Competence w/ Dr. Solandy Forte

This week we’re joined by special guest, Dr. Solandy Forte, of Milestones Behavioral Services, to help us to gain a better understanding of the issue of cultural competence. It’s a very client-centered episode which lays out the positives and pitfalls that improved cultural understanding can bring.

Articles discussed this episode:

Fong, E.H., Catagnus, R.M., Brodhead, M.T., Quigley, S., & Field, S. (2016). Developing the cultural awareness skills of behavior analysts. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 84-94. doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0111-6

Fong, E.H. & Tanaka, S. (2013). Multicultural alliance of behavior analysis standards for cultural competence in behavior analysis. International Journal of Behavioral Consultation and Therapy, 8, 17-19. doi: 10.1037/h0100970

Young-Pelton, C.A. & Dotson, T.D. (2017). Ethical issues in rural programs for behavior analysis for students with disabilities. Rural Special Education Quarterly, 36, 38-48. doi: 10.1177/8756870517703407

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 52 - (ETHICS) You Need an Ethics Coordinator!

We're back with another full-length episode on the subject of ethics in the workplace.  This week, we're all convinced that you probably need an ethics guru to steer your ship with best practices.  And it'd be great if they understood confidentiality laws too, otherwise, your files might end up at the mercy of a data hamburglar! While you start hiring this magical individual, we'll do our best to walk you through HIPAA, FERPA, and all its friends including Diana's handy-dandy legal quiz.  Some fun facts to whet your appetite: a pod of hippos is not a HIPPA and Rob's passwords all start with names of Star Wars characters. 

Articles discussed this episode:

Cavalari, R.N.S., Gillis, J.M., Kruser, N., & Romanczyk, R.G.  (2015).  Digital communication and records in service provision and supervision: Regulation and practice.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 8, 176-189. doi: 10.1007/s40617-014-0030-3

Brodhead, M.T. & Higbee, T.S.  (2012).  Teaching and maintaining ethical behavior in a professional organization.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 82-88. doi: 10.1007/BF03391827

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 51 - (ETHICS) Ethics and Social Media

Put down that Facebook! Drop those Twitters! You can't risk a moment more on social media without first listening to this important episode on the ethics of social media.  Think it's ok to share pictures of your fellow BCBAs relaxing on the beach on Instragram? What about Snapchatting with colleagues to discuss possible solutions a client with SIB? Y'know what: Don't even try to answer without listening to Rob, Diana, and Jackie discuss articles all about social media and the ethical quandry you may already be in!

And, don't forget a handy link to the updated BACB Ethical Guidelines so you can read along.

Articles discussed this episode:

O'Leary, P.N., Miller, M.M., Olive, M.L., & Kelly, A.N.  (2017).  Blurred lines: Ethical implications of social media for behavior analysts.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 10, 45-51. doi:10.1007/s40617-014-0033-0

Chretien, K.C., Goldman, E.F., Beckman, L., & Kind, T.  (2010).  It's your own risk: Medical students' perspetives on online professionalism.  Academic Medicine, 85, S68-S71. doi: 10.1097/ACM/0b013e3181ed4778

Greysen, S.R., Kind, T., Chretien, K.C.  (2010).  Online professionalism and the mirror of social media.  Journal of General Internal Medicine, 25, 1227-1229. doi: 10.1007/s11606-010-1447-1

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 51 Preview

Because one episode wasn't enough, we've got TWO big ethics episodes coming up throughout the rest of March.  And not just any ethics! We're going to dive deep into the pitfalls inherent in social media and technology.  How the heck can I post inappropriate pictures online and stay on the right side of my ethical obligations (answer: you can't!) and is it possible to teach my staff and co-workers to be an upstanding citizen of ethics (answer: it is!).  In the meantime enjoy some Errata about a poorly behaved cat and a Rob ProTip about snagging your dream jobs.  The power is yours!

Articles for the next two weeks:

O'Leary, P.N., Miller, M.M., Olive, M.L., & Kelly, A.N.  (2017).  Blurred lines: Ethical implications of social media for behavior analysts.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 10, 45-51. doi:10.1007/s40617-014-0033-0

Chretien, K.C., Goldman, E.F., Beckman, L., & Kind, T.  (2010).  It's your own risk: Medical students' perspetives on online professionalism.  Academic Medicine, 85, S68-S71. doi: 10.1097/ACM/0b013e3181ed4778

Greysen, S.R., Kind, T., Chretien, K.C.  (2010).  Online professionalism and the mirror of social media.  Journal of General Internal Medicine, 25, 1227-1229. doi: 10.1007/s11606-010-1447-1

Cavalari, R.N.S., Gillis, J.M., Kruser,N., & Romanczyk, R.G.  (2015).  Digital communication and records in service provision and supervision: Regulation and practice.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 8, 176-189. doi: 10.1007/s40617-014-0030-3

Brodhead, M.T. & Higbee, T.S.  (2012).  Teaching and maintaining ethical behavior in a professional organization.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 82-88. doi: 10.1007/BF03391827

Episode 26 - How to Talk to Non-Behavior Analysts Without Really Trying

It's our second ETHICS episode so gather around the ol' podcast table to learn how to disseminate behavior analysis to anyone and everyone without getting exiled from your place of employment.  Here are some things you shouldn't do: 1) flip tables in a fit of rage when anyone proposes hippotherapy 2) break-up with your boyfriend over his insistence that a "mind-file" is a real thing and 3) use data sheets as deadly weapons.  Oh, you wanted us to tell you what you should do? Guess you'll have to listen to the show.  C'mon...there's discussion about a decision tree coming up!

Articles discussed this episode:

Bercirevic, A.  (2014).  Ask the Experts: How can new students defend behavior analysis from misunderstandings? Behavior Analysis in Practice, 7, 138-140.  doi: 10.1007/s40617-014-0019-y

Critchfield, T.  (2014).  Ten rules for discussing behavior analysis.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 7, 141-142.  doi:  10.1007/s40617-014-0026-z

Todd, J.  (2014).  Some useful resources for students who are tempted to bring enlightenment to errant non-behaviorists.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 7, 143-144.  doi: 10.1007/s40617-014-0027-y

Brodhead, M.  (2015).  Maintaining professional relationships in an interdisciplinary setting:  Strategies for navigating nonbehavioral treatment recommendations for individuals with autism.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 8, 70-78.  doi:  10.1007/s40617-015-0042-7

Luiselli, J.  (2015).  In response: Maintaining professional relationships in an interdisciplinary setting: Strategies for navigating non-behavioral treatment recommendations for individuals with autism.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 8, 79.  doi:  10.1007/s40617-015-0043-6 

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 26 Preview

The only thing better than sharing the amazing science of behavior analysis to the masses is learning how to do it better and netting an ethics CE in the process.  Everybody wins! Except for Jackie who has never seen Back to the Future and Diana who has never seen Aspergers R Us live and Rob who was so disappointed to learn that talking to non-behavior analysts actually did require trying.  But, hey, at least we've updated the previous episodes page so you can find all of our classic capers.

Articles for next week:

Bercirevic, A.  (2014).  Ask the Experts: How can new students defend behavior analysis from misunderstandings? Behavior Analysis in Practice, 7, 138-140.  doi: 10.1007/s40617-014-0019-y

Critchfield, T.  (2014).  Ten rules for discussing behavior analysis.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 7, 141-142.  doi:  10.1007/s40617-014-0026-z

Todd, J.  (2014).  Some useful resources for students who are tempted to bring enlightenment to errant non-behaviorists.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 7, 143-144.  doi: 10.1007/s40617-014-0027-y

Brodhead, M.  (2015).  Maintaining professional relationships in an interdisciplinary setting:  Strategies for navigating nonbehavioral treatment recommendations for individuals with autism.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 8, 70-78.  doi:  10.1007/s40617-015-0042-7

Luiselli, J.  (2015).  In response: Maintaining professional relationships in an interdisciplinary setting: Strategies for navigating non-behavioral treatment recommendations for individuals with autism.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 8, 79.  doi:  10.1007/s40617-015-0043-6 

Episode 17 - Ethics in Data Collection

If you think you're a pro at tracking behavior, this week's episode may be a cue to reflect on just how easy it is to collect bad data. We're joined by special guest Dr. Amanda Karsten to discuss the ethics of taking good data as behavior analysts.  Dr. Karsten reviews some great tips on how to go from data squirrel to data hero as well as some practical suggestions to get you using data ethically today! Plus, Diana shares a quiz to find out what kind of data you are and Jackie plugs her new ABA Christmas album.  Rob sits in shock at the stark realization that he only uses data for evil.  And for folks applying for continuing education credits, this episode counts towards 1 Ethics CE.

Articles discussed this episode:

LeBlanc, L.A., Raetz, P.B., Sellers, T.P., & Carr, J.E.  (2016).  A proposed model for selecting measurement procedures for the assessment and treatment of problem behavior.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 77-83. doi: 10.1007/s40617-015-0063-2

Vollmer, T.R., Sloman, K.N., & St. Peter Pipkin, C.  (2008).  Practical implications of data reliability and treatment integrity monitoring.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 4-11.  

Carey, M.K. & Bourret, J.C.  (2014).  Effects of data sampling on graphical depictions of learning.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analylsis, 47, 749-764.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.153

This episode provides 1 ETHICS CE.  

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.