Episode 97 - Supervision Series III, pt. 1 - Staff Feedback w/ Dr. Amy Henley

Get excited, everyone, because Supervision September is finally here! Up first, we have special guest, Dr. Amy Henley joining us to discuss her research on staff management and the proper delivery of feedback. Then we all take a break from podcasting to order the feedback sandwich. Was it as delicious as thought it would be? And did Rob’s extra pickles actually improve feedback?

Articles discussed this episode:

Choi, E., Johnson, D.A., Moon, K., & Oah, S. (2018). Effects of positive and negative feedback sequence on work performance and emotional responses. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 38, 97-115. doi: 10.1080/01608061.2017/1423151

Alvero, A.M., Bucklin, B.R., & Austin, J. (2001). An objective review of the effectiveness and essential characteristics of performance feedback in organizational settings (1985-1998). Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 21, 3-29. doi: 10.1300/J075v21n01_02

DiGennaro Reed, F.D. & Henley, A.J. (2015). A survey of staff training and performance management practices: the Good, the bad, and the ugly. Behavior Analysis and Practice, 8, 16-26. doi: 10.1007/s40617-015-0044-5

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

September 2019 Preview

Back by popular demand, it’s SUPERVISION SEPTEMBER! The one month of the year where you’re guaranteed three straight weeks of podcasting all about the fascinating topic of staff supervision. This year we’re back with a full slate of research articles and discussion all about that most critical of supervision topics: Our staff. We talk about how, when, and why to give feedback, what we can do as supervisors to minimize burnout, and just how effective our staff rewards systems really are.

Articles discussed this episode:

Supervision Series III, pt. 1 - Staff Feedback w/ Dr. Amy Henley

Choi, E., Johnson, D.A., Moon, K., & Oah, S. (2018). Effects of positive and negative feedback sequence on work performance and emotional responses. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 38, 97-115. doi: 10.1080/01608061.2017/1423151

Alvero, A.M., Bucklin, B.R., & Austin, J. (2001). An objective review of the effectiveness and essential characteristics of performance feedback in organizational settings (1985-1998). Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 21, 3-29. doi: 10.1300/J075v21n01_02

DiGennaro Reed, F.D. & Henley, A.J. (2015). A survey of staff training and performance management practices: the Good, the bad, and the ugly. Behavior Analysis and Practice, 8, 16-26. doi: 10.1007/s40617-015-0044-5

Supervision Series III, pt. 2 - Staff Burnout

Kazemi, E., Shapiro, M., & Kavner, A. (2015). Predictors of intention to turnover in behavior technicians working with individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Research in Autism Spectrum Disorders, 17, 106-115. doi: 10.1016/j.rasd.2015.06.012

Hensel, J.M., Lunsky, Y., & Dewa, C.S. (2015). Exposure to aggressive behaviour and burnout in direct support providers: the Role of positive work factors. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 36, 404-412. doi: 10.1016/j.ridd/2014.10.033

Plantiveau, C., Ounavi, K., & Virues-Ortega, J. (2018). Hih levels of burnout among early-career board-certified behavior analysts with low collegial support in the work environment. European Journal of Behavior Analysis, 2, 195-207. doi: 10.1080/15021149.2018.1438339

Supervision Series III, pt. 3 - Staff Reinforcement

Tews, M.J., Michel, J.W., & Stafford, K. (2013). Does fun pay? the Impact of workplace fun on employee turnover and performance. Cornell Hospitality Quarterly, 54, 370-382. doi: 10.1177/1938965513505355

Johnson, D.A. & Dickinson, A.M. (2010). Employee-of-the-month programs: Do they really work? Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 30, 308-324. doi: 10.1080/01608061.2010.520144

Wine, B., Edgerton, L., Inzana, E., & Newcomb, E.T. (2017). Further effects of lottery odds on responding. Journal of Organizational Behavior Management, 37, 75-82. doi: 10.1080/01608061.2016.1267064

Episode 88 - (ETHICS) The Ethics of Telehealth

We all live in an interconnected, WiFi world. So shouldn’t our work as behavior analysts be the same? Telehealth provides an exciting means to share our science at a distance; however, if we’re not careful, who knows what ethical dilemmas using this technology might lead us into. Have no fear! Your pals at ABA Inside Track hit the books—well, research articles—to figure out some tactics for the ethical BCBA to follow instead.

Articles discussed this episode:

Peterson, S.M., Woodward, J., Crane, J,, & Garner, M. (2009). Teleconsultaiton in school settings: Linking classroom teachers and behavior analysts through web-based technology. Behavior Analysis in Practice,, 2, 32-39. doi: 10.1007/BF03391746

Machalicek, W., Lequia, J., Pinkelman, S., Knowles, C., Raulston, T., Davis, T., & Alresheed, F. (2016). Behavioral teleheatlh consultation with families of children with autism spectrum disorder. Behavioral Interventions, 31, 223-250. doi: 10.1002/bin.1450

Kaplan, B. & Litewka, S. (2008). Ethical challenges of telemedicine and telehealth. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, 17, 401-416. doi: 10.1017/S0963180108080535

Hall, J.L. & McGraw, D. (2014). For telehealth to succeed, privacy and security risks must be identified and addressed. Health Affairs, 33, 216-221. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0997

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

June 2019 Preview

Starting summer off right with journal articles! This month we get back into a discussion of ethical dilemmas with the use of telehealth and telemedicine before inviting Dr. Stacie Bancroft to share some advance chaining variations. Finally, while we all enjoy some time off, a look back into the archives with our classic episode on research related to virtual reality. Bonus: Rob’s award-winning writings are only marginally embarrassing to hear about.

Articles for June 2019

Episode 88 - Ethics of Telehealth

Peterson, S.M., Woodward, J., Crane, J,, & Garner, M. (2009). Teleconsultaiton in school settings: Linking classroom teachers and behavior analysts through web-based technology. Behavior Analysis in Practice,, 2, 32-39. doi: 10.1007/BF03391746

Machalicek, W., Lequia, J., Pinkelman, S., Knowles, C., Raulston, T., Davis, T., & Alresheed, F. (2016). Behavioral teleheatlh consultation with families of children with autism spectrum disorder. Behavioral Interventions, 31, 223-250. doi: 10.1002/bin.1450

Kaplan, B. & Litewka, S. (2008). Ethical challenges of telemedicine and telehealth. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, 17, 401-416. doi: 10.1017/S0963180108080535

Hall, J.L. & McGraw, D. (2014). For telehealth to succeed, privacy and security risks must be identified and addressed. Health Affairs, 33, 216-221. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0997

Episode 89 - Next-Level Chaining w/ Dr. Stacie Bancroft

Bancroft, S.L., Weiss, J.S., Libby, M.E., & Ahearn, W.H. (2011). A comparison of procedural variations in teaching behavior chains: Manual guidance, trainer completion, and no completion of untrained steps. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 559-569. doi: 10.1901/jaba.2011.44-559

Slocum, S.K. & Tiger, J.H. (2011). An assessment of the efficiency of and child preference for forward and backward chaining. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 793-805. doi: 10.1901/jaba.2011.44-793

Lambert, J.M., Copeland, B.A., Karp, E.L., Finley, C.I., .Houchins-Juarez, N.J., & Ledford, J.R. (2016). Chaining functional basketball sequences (with embedded conditional discriminations) in an adolescent with autism. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 199-210. doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0125-0

(REBROADCAST) Episode 25 - Virtual Reality

Bouchard, S., Cote, S., St-Jacques, J., Robillard, G., & Renaud, P.   (2006).  Effectiveness of virtual reality exposure in the treatment of arachnophobia using 3D games.  Technology and Health Care, 14, 19-27.  

Padgett, L.S., Strickland, D., & Coles, C.D.  (2006).  Case study: Using a virtual reality computer game to teach fire safety skills to children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome.  Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 31, 65-70.  doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsj030

Morina, N., Ijntema, H., Meyerbroker, K., & Emmelkamp, P.M.G.  (2015).  Can virtual reality exposure therapy gains be generalized to real-life? A meta-analysis of studies applying behavioral assessments.  Behaviour Research and Therapy, 74.  18-24.  doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2015.08.010

Episode 65 - (SUPERVISION) Supervision Series II, pt 3 - Behavioral Skills Training for All

It’s been a wonderful September full of supervision and we round out this group of episodes with a review of the best ways to train others. Surprisingly, the answer includes even more training. Plus stories of our first jobs, Mickey Mouse’s first words, and first steps towards skill competency. The rationale for listening to our podcast is excellence!

Articles discussed this episode:

Parsons, M.B., Rollyson, J.H., & Reid, D.H.  (2012).  Evidence-based staff training: A guide for practitioners.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 2-11.  doi: 10.1007/BF03391819

Parsons, M.B., Rollyson, J.H., & Reid, D.H.  (2013).  Teaching practitioners to conduct behavioral skills training: A pyramidal approach for training multiple human service staff.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 6, 4-16.  doi: 10.1007/BF03391798

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page (or here if you'd like the Supervision Series II bundle). You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 63 - (SUPERVISION) Supervision Series II, pt 1 - The Future of Supervision w/ Dr. Jamie Hughes-Lika

Supervision September 2 starts off this week with a look at the future of supervision.  Namely, we discuss updates to supervision for BCBA trainees as laid out this past year by the BACB.  Then, after the dry stuff, Rob talks with Dr. Jamie Hughes-Lika of Summit Autism Services about some technology tools that may make your supervision a little easier.  Not discussed: Magical supervision robots who log your training hours minute-by-minute.  Though wouldn't that be cool?

Articles discussed this episode:

BACB Newsletter (October 2017)

BACB Newsletter (March 2018)

BCBA/BCaBA Experience Standards: Monthly System

Twyman, J.S.  (2014).  Envisioning education 3.0: The fusion of behavior analysis, learning science and technology.  Mexican Journal of Behavior Analysis, 40, 20-38.  doi: 10.5514/rmac.v40.i2.63663

Resource Links:

Mentimeter

Kahoot

Google Drive

Techsmith (makers of Camtasia)

GoReact

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page (or here if you'd like the Supervision Series II bundle when it's available after the episodes all go live). You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 63-65 Previews

Back in time for the start of the new school year,  it's our 2nd (annual?) Supervision September! All this month, we have episodes devoted solely to supervision: Supervision and technology, barriers to supervision, and supervision in training others.  That's three episodes on supervision in a row! Plus, we unveil our exciting survey on technology (hey, would you mind taking it?) and talk about our appearances at the BABAT and Thompson Center Autism conferences in October.  See you there!

Articles for next episodes:

Episode 63

BACB Newsletter (October 2017)

BACB Newsletter (March 2018)

BCBA/BCaBA Experience Standards: Monthly System

Twyman, J.S.  (2014).  Envisioning education 3.0: The fusion of behavior analysis, learning science and technology.  Mexican Journal of Behavior Analysis, 40, 20-38.  doi: 10.5514/rmac.v40.i2.63663

Episode 64

Sellers, T.P, LeBlanc, L.A., & Valentino, A.L.  (2016).  Recommendations for detecting and addressing barriers to successful supervision.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 309-319.  doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0142-z

Sellers, T.P., Valentino, A.L., & LeBlanc, L.A.  (2016).  Recommended practices for individual supervision of aspiring behavior analysts.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 274-286.  doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0110-7

Episode 65

Parsons, M.B., Rollyson, J.H., & Reid, D.H.  (2012).  Evidence-based staff training: A guide for practitioners.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 2-11.  doi: 10.1007/BF03391819

Parsons, M.B., Rollyson, J.H., & Reid, D.H.  (2013).  Teaching practitioners to conduct behavioral skills training: A pyramidal approach for training multiple human service staff.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 6, 4-16.  doi: 10.1007/BF03391798

 

Episode 52 - (ETHICS) You Need an Ethics Coordinator!

We're back with another full-length episode on the subject of ethics in the workplace.  This week, we're all convinced that you probably need an ethics guru to steer your ship with best practices.  And it'd be great if they understood confidentiality laws too, otherwise, your files might end up at the mercy of a data hamburglar! While you start hiring this magical individual, we'll do our best to walk you through HIPAA, FERPA, and all its friends including Diana's handy-dandy legal quiz.  Some fun facts to whet your appetite: a pod of hippos is not a HIPPA and Rob's passwords all start with names of Star Wars characters. 

Articles discussed this episode:

Cavalari, R.N.S., Gillis, J.M., Kruser, N., & Romanczyk, R.G.  (2015).  Digital communication and records in service provision and supervision: Regulation and practice.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 8, 176-189. doi: 10.1007/s40617-014-0030-3

Brodhead, M.T. & Higbee, T.S.  (2012).  Teaching and maintaining ethical behavior in a professional organization.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 82-88. doi: 10.1007/BF03391827

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 51 Preview

Because one episode wasn't enough, we've got TWO big ethics episodes coming up throughout the rest of March.  And not just any ethics! We're going to dive deep into the pitfalls inherent in social media and technology.  How the heck can I post inappropriate pictures online and stay on the right side of my ethical obligations (answer: you can't!) and is it possible to teach my staff and co-workers to be an upstanding citizen of ethics (answer: it is!).  In the meantime enjoy some Errata about a poorly behaved cat and a Rob ProTip about snagging your dream jobs.  The power is yours!

Articles for the next two weeks:

O'Leary, P.N., Miller, M.M., Olive, M.L., & Kelly, A.N.  (2017).  Blurred lines: Ethical implications of social media for behavior analysts.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 10, 45-51. doi:10.1007/s40617-014-0033-0

Chretien, K.C., Goldman, E.F., Beckman, L., & Kind, T.  (2010).  It's your own risk: Medical students' perspetives on online professionalism.  Academic Medicine, 85, S68-S71. doi: 10.1097/ACM/0b013e3181ed4778

Greysen, S.R., Kind, T., Chretien, K.C.  (2010).  Online professionalism and the mirror of social media.  Journal of General Internal Medicine, 25, 1227-1229. doi: 10.1007/s11606-010-1447-1

Cavalari, R.N.S., Gillis, J.M., Kruser,N., & Romanczyk, R.G.  (2015).  Digital communication and records in service provision and supervision: Regulation and practice.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 8, 176-189. doi: 10.1007/s40617-014-0030-3

Brodhead, M.T. & Higbee, T.S.  (2012).  Teaching and maintaining ethical behavior in a professional organization.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 5, 82-88. doi: 10.1007/BF03391827