Episode 41 - Sports Performance w/ Dr. Mallory Quinn

This week we're joined in the virtual studio with special guest, Dr. Mallory Quinn from ABA Sports Innovations, to talk about behavior analysis and improving sports performance.  We stare blankly at one another while trying to figure out how pole vaulting works before Mallory breaks out the glitter and graphs to demonstrate how to improve dance moves.  Then we stop everything for a musical number.  Eat your heart out, Ryan Gosling!

Articles discussed this episode:

Scott, D., Scott, L.M., & Goldwater, B.  (1997).  A performance improvement program for an international-level track and field athlete.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 573-575.  doi:  10.1901/jaba.1997.30-573   

Quinn, M., Miltenberger, R., Abreau, A., & Narozanick, T.  (2017).  An intervention featuring public posting and graphical feedback to enhance the performance of competitive dancers.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 10, 1-11.  doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0164-6

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 41 Preview

We're back to our regularly scheduled programming next week with a review of articles related to sports performance.  Can you become a hooperball athlete and score all the slam runs? Special guest Mallory Quinn has all the research for you.  In the meantime we reconvene to discuss some more supervision, specifically, how to TAKE feedback from others...with mixed results.

Articles for next week:

Scott, D., Scott, L.M., & Goldwater, B.  (1997).  A performance improvement program for an international-level track and field athlete.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 30, 573-575.  doi:  10.1901/jaba.1997.30-573   

Quinn, M., Miltenberger, R., Abreau, A., & Narozanick, T.  (2017).  An intervention featuring public posting and graphical feedback to enhance the performance of competitive dancers.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 10, 1-11.  doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0164-6

Episode 30 - Prompting

Welcome to prompting Thunderdome where only one type of prompting can survive! Will it be the classic most-to-least prompt? The odd-sounding "no-no" prompt? Maybe least-to-most prompting will take the top prize.  All we can say is, you won't believe who wins it all! Plus, the secrets of Diana's birthday present, hot takes on prompts Rob hates, and the most famous Duplo constructs this side of the Mississippi.   Prompting research is the ::expectant look::

Articles discussed this episode:

Libby, M.E., Weiss, J.S., Bancroft, S., & Ahearn, W.H.  (2008).  A comparison of most-to-least and least-to-most prompting on the acquisitio of solitary play skills.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 37-43.  

Leaf, J.B., Sheldon, J.B., & Sherman, J.A.  (2010).  Comparison of simultaneous prompting and no-no prompting in two-choice discrimination learning with children with autism.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 43, 215-228.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.2010.43-215

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 30 Preview

Let's get ready for prompting with this week's new preview episode.  Ever wonder what the best prompts around are? We get the discussion going with a comparison of most-to-least, least-to-most, simultaneous, and no-no prompts.  But before the big discussion next week, Diana stops to finally give us all our gifts from APBA and to share some excellent listener emails.  Then we discuss Julia, the new Muppet with autism on Sesame Street.  Finally, other nonsense ensues, probably something with Jackie and terrible TV shows.

Articles for next week:

Libby, M.E., Weiss, J.S., Bancroft, S., & Ahearn, W.H.  (2008).  A comparison of most-to-least and least-to-most prompting on the acquisitio of solitary play skills.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 37-43.  

Leaf, J.B., Sheldon, J.B., & Sherman, J.A.  (2010).  Comparison of simultaneous prompting and no-no prompting in two-choice discrimination learning with children with autism.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 43, 215-228.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.2010.43-215

Episode 24 - Return of the Grab Bag!

Behavior analysis runs wild and free, no longer bound by educational research in this, the Return of the Grab Bag! Between sharing tips for what to watch on maternity leave and positing which one of your hosts is actually a ghost, we discuss research related to taking medicine on time, breaking the cycle of procrastination, and getting off your butt.  Is it really true that negative reinforcement makes the world go round? Count on your favorite space acquaintances to weigh in on that question and more.

Articles discussed this episode:

Johnson, Jr., P.E., Perrin, C.J., Salo, A., Deschaine, E., & Johnson, B.  (2016).  Use of an explicit rule decreases procrastination in university students.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 49, 346-358.  doi:  10.1002/jaba.287

Raiff, B.R., Jarvis, B.P., & Dallery, J.  (2016).  Text-message reminders plus incentives increase adherence to antidiabetic meication in adults with type 2 diabetes.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 49, 947-953.  doi:  10.1002/jaba.337

Green, N., Sigurdsson, S., & Wilder, D.A.  (2016).  Decreasing bouts of prolonged sitting among office workers.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 49, 717-722.  doi:  10.1002/jaba.309

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 24 Preview

It's the Return of the Grab Bag and boy do we have a varied assortment of articles from the world of applied behavior analysis.  Can we incentivize taking medication on time? How do we avoid sitting down all day until we die? And is it true that studying is an aversive event? Join us next week for the full episode where the answers to these questions and more will be revealed.

Pardon our review of dance movies of the 00s; it's our first recording of 2017.  

Articles for next week:

Johnson, Jr., P.E., Perrin, C.J., Salo, A., Deschaine, E., & Johnson, B.  (2016).  Use of an explicit rule decreases procrastination in university students.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 49, 346-358.  doi:  10.1002/jaba.287

Raiff, B.R., Jarvis, B.P., & Dallery, J.  (2016).  Text-message reminders plus incentives increase adherence to antidiabetic meication in adults with type 2 diabetes.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 49, 947-953.  doi:  10.1002/jaba.337

Green, N., Sigurdsson, S., & Wilder, D.A.  (2016).  Decreasing bouts of prolonged sitting among office workers.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 49, 717-722.  doi:  10.1002/jaba.309