Episode 89 - Next-Level Chaining w/ Dr. Stacie Bancroft

Everybody loves the idea of teaching complex behaviors. Everybody loves teaching new skills efficiently. Is it always possible to do both? Dr. Stacie Bancroft joins us to explain how these two great goals can go great together. This ain’t your parents’ chaining procedure.

Articles discussed this episode:

Bancroft, S.L., Weiss, J.S., Libby, M.E., & Ahearn, W.H. (2011). A comparison of procedural variations in teaching behavior chains: Manual guidance, trainer completion, and no completion of untrained steps. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 559-569. doi: 10.1901/jaba.2011.44-559

Slocum, S.K. & Tiger, J.H. (2011). An assessment of the efficiency of and child preference for forward and backward chaining. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 793-805. doi: 10.1901/jaba.2011.44-793

Lambert, J.M., Copeland, B.A., Karp, E.L., Finley, C.I., .Houchins-Juarez, N.J., & Ledford, J.R. (2016). Chaining functional basketball sequences (with embedded conditional discriminations) in an adolescent with autism. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 199-210. doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0125-0

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

June 2019 Preview

Starting summer off right with journal articles! This month we get back into a discussion of ethical dilemmas with the use of telehealth and telemedicine before inviting Dr. Stacie Bancroft to share some advance chaining variations. Finally, while we all enjoy some time off, a look back into the archives with our classic episode on research related to virtual reality. Bonus: Rob’s award-winning writings are only marginally embarrassing to hear about.

Articles for June 2019

Episode 88 - Ethics of Telehealth

Peterson, S.M., Woodward, J., Crane, J,, & Garner, M. (2009). Teleconsultaiton in school settings: Linking classroom teachers and behavior analysts through web-based technology. Behavior Analysis in Practice,, 2, 32-39. doi: 10.1007/BF03391746

Machalicek, W., Lequia, J., Pinkelman, S., Knowles, C., Raulston, T., Davis, T., & Alresheed, F. (2016). Behavioral teleheatlh consultation with families of children with autism spectrum disorder. Behavioral Interventions, 31, 223-250. doi: 10.1002/bin.1450

Kaplan, B. & Litewka, S. (2008). Ethical challenges of telemedicine and telehealth. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics, 17, 401-416. doi: 10.1017/S0963180108080535

Hall, J.L. & McGraw, D. (2014). For telehealth to succeed, privacy and security risks must be identified and addressed. Health Affairs, 33, 216-221. doi: 10.1377/hlthaff.2013.0997

Episode 89 - Next-Level Chaining w/ Dr. Stacie Bancroft

Bancroft, S.L., Weiss, J.S., Libby, M.E., & Ahearn, W.H. (2011). A comparison of procedural variations in teaching behavior chains: Manual guidance, trainer completion, and no completion of untrained steps. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 559-569. doi: 10.1901/jaba.2011.44-559

Slocum, S.K. & Tiger, J.H. (2011). An assessment of the efficiency of and child preference for forward and backward chaining. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 793-805. doi: 10.1901/jaba.2011.44-793

Lambert, J.M., Copeland, B.A., Karp, E.L., Finley, C.I., .Houchins-Juarez, N.J., & Ledford, J.R. (2016). Chaining functional basketball sequences (with embedded conditional discriminations) in an adolescent with autism. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 199-210. doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0125-0

(REBROADCAST) Episode 25 - Virtual Reality

Bouchard, S., Cote, S., St-Jacques, J., Robillard, G., & Renaud, P.   (2006).  Effectiveness of virtual reality exposure in the treatment of arachnophobia using 3D games.  Technology and Health Care, 14, 19-27.  

Padgett, L.S., Strickland, D., & Coles, C.D.  (2006).  Case study: Using a virtual reality computer game to teach fire safety skills to children diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome.  Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 31, 65-70.  doi: 10.1093/jpepsy/jsj030

Morina, N., Ijntema, H., Meyerbroker, K., & Emmelkamp, P.M.G.  (2015).  Can virtual reality exposure therapy gains be generalized to real-life? A meta-analysis of studies applying behavioral assessments.  Behaviour Research and Therapy, 74.  18-24.  doi: 10.1016/j.brat.2015.08.010

Episode 30 - Prompting

Welcome to prompting Thunderdome where only one type of prompting can survive! Will it be the classic most-to-least prompt? The odd-sounding "no-no" prompt? Maybe least-to-most prompting will take the top prize.  All we can say is, you won't believe who wins it all! Plus, the secrets of Diana's birthday present, hot takes on prompts Rob hates, and the most famous Duplo constructs this side of the Mississippi.   Prompting research is the ::expectant look::

Articles discussed this episode:

Libby, M.E., Weiss, J.S., Bancroft, S., & Ahearn, W.H.  (2008).  A comparison of most-to-least and least-to-most prompting on the acquisitio of solitary play skills.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 37-43.  

Leaf, J.B., Sheldon, J.B., & Sherman, J.A.  (2010).  Comparison of simultaneous prompting and no-no prompting in two-choice discrimination learning with children with autism.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 43, 215-228.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.2010.43-215

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 30 Preview

Let's get ready for prompting with this week's new preview episode.  Ever wonder what the best prompts around are? We get the discussion going with a comparison of most-to-least, least-to-most, simultaneous, and no-no prompts.  But before the big discussion next week, Diana stops to finally give us all our gifts from APBA and to share some excellent listener emails.  Then we discuss Julia, the new Muppet with autism on Sesame Street.  Finally, other nonsense ensues, probably something with Jackie and terrible TV shows.

Articles for next week:

Libby, M.E., Weiss, J.S., Bancroft, S., & Ahearn, W.H.  (2008).  A comparison of most-to-least and least-to-most prompting on the acquisitio of solitary play skills.  Behavior Analysis in Practice, 1, 37-43.  

Leaf, J.B., Sheldon, J.B., & Sherman, J.A.  (2010).  Comparison of simultaneous prompting and no-no prompting in two-choice discrimination learning with children with autism.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 43, 215-228.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.2010.43-215

The Basics of Picture Activity Schedules - A Quick Review

I love trainings: attending, running, creating.  I'd put together a brief training for registered behavior technicians on using picture activity schedules recently and, as it contained some of the recent research updates, thought it'd be a good review of the past literature on picture activity schedules for our audience.  

Episode 4 - Novel Behavior and Lag Schedules

In this week's episode, we review articles on novel behavior.  Diana gushes over lag schedules and their effects on novel architectural features in children's play, Rob demands 21st-century learning for America, and Jackie wishes for her very own block building kit.  Then the gang gets cerebral in a discussion about creativity as behavior.  All that and the home version of the Novel Vocalizations Game!

Articles reviewed in this episode:

Goetz, E.M. & Baer, D.M. (1973).  Social control of form diversity and the emergence of new forms in children's blockbuilding.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 6, 209-217.  doi:  10.1901/jaba.1973.6-209

Cammillieri, A.P. & Hanley, G.P.  (2005).  Use of a lag differential reinforcement contingency to increase varied selections of classroom activities.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 38, 111-115.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.2005.34-04

Esch, J.W., Esch, B.E., & Love, J.R.  (2009).  Increasing vocal variability in children with autism using a lag schedule of reinforcement.  The Analysis of Verbal Behavior, 25, 73-78.

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 3 - Social Stories

This week we bring you the maaaaaagic of stories as we discuss the use of social stories in skill instruction.  Will these popular and easy-to-create documents prove successful in training children to engage in more prosocial skills? Or will social stories turn out too good to be true.  All this plus Rob talks Muppet eye contact, Jackie engages in literal potty talk, and Diana sums it all up with a Little Critter metaphor.

Don't forget the "Leave a Review on iTunes" contest.  Just by leaving us a review, you're entered into the random drawing where the prize is a free CE! Well, the fee is waived...you still have to listen to the show and such.  I consider that a double-prize! You've got until next week's preview episode (April 13th).  Good luck!

Articles reviewed this episode:

Crozier, S. & Tincani, M. (2007).  Effects of social stories on prosocial behavior of preschool children with autism spectrum disorders.  Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37(9), 1803-1814.

Thiemann, K.S. & Goldstein, H. (2001).  Social stories, written text cues, and video feedback: Effects on social communication of children with autism.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 34(4), 425-446.

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.