Episode 73 - General-Case Analysis

So, you learned a new skill. That’s great! But can you use that skill over here? How about here? What about with these items? If you said no, perhaps you’d be interested in hearing all about general-case analysis, a nifty classic technique that provides all the handy-dandy steps you need to promote amazing response generalization. Plus, we remember that cigarette machines used to be a thing.

Articles discussed this episode:

Chadsey-Rusch, J., Drasgow, E., Reinoehl, B., Halle, J., & Collet-Klingenberg, L. (1993). Using general-case instruction to teach spontaneous and generalized requests for assistance to learners with severe disabilities. Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 18, 177-187. doi:10.1177/154079699301800304

Sprague, J.R. & Horner, R.H. (1984). The effects of single instance, multiple instance, and general case training on generalized vending machine use by moderately and severely handicapped students. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 17, 273-278. doi: 10.1901/jaba.1984.17-273

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 28 - FCT

SPOILER WARNING! 

FCT is superior to many other treatments.  If you want to know which treatments, you'll have to go 5 rounds with Diabolical Dr. D in the ring, suffer through Rob's snooty New England anecdotes, and share your favorite foods to eat while reading journal articles with Jackie.  Only then will you have the joy of hearing a discussion about Carr and Durand and the epic Tale of FCR.  And you won't even need to use an FCR response (or should that be FC response?) to witness the heartwarming return of the lag schedule.  This podcast is like EZ tasks 100, folks!

Articles discussed this episode:

Carr, E.G. & Durand, V.M.  (1985).  Reducing behavior problems through functional communication training.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 18, 111-126.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.1985.18-111

Reeve, C.E. & Carr, E.G.  (2000).  Prevention of severe behavior problems in children with developmental disorders.  Journal of Positive Behavior Interventions, 2, 144-160.  doi: 10.11777/109830070000200303

Adami, S., Falcomata, T.S., Muething, C.S., & Hoffman, K.  (2017).  An evaluation of lag schedules of reinforcemetn during functional communication training: Effects of varied mand responding and challenging behavior.  Behavior Analysis in Practice doi:10.1007/s40617-017-0179-7

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 22 - AAC

Despite sounding like Lunchlady Doris from the Simpsons and zoning in and out of consciousness, Rob does his best to attend to Jackie and Diana's review of articles about augmentative and alternative communication (AAC).  Whether using picture exchange or a speech-generating device, there's a lot to learn about how practitioners can improve the communication and vocalizations of clients using AAC.  Plus, the proper nomenclature when discussing PECS, echoics in the face of outrageous accents, using "all done" to end a showtune review, and how to mand for the popcorn that's across the table.  I think I got it.  Just play the episode again, I wasn't listening.

Special shout-out to Kate Ahern and her website, Teaching Learners With Multiple Special Needs for the amazing Periodic Table of AAC image in the episode thumbnail and in the post body below, as well as for being a great resource for special education technology news.

Source: Kate Ahern, Teaching Learners with Multiple Special Needs

Source: Kate Ahern, Teaching Learners with Multiple Special Needs

Episode 22 Preview

On this week's preview edition, we get ready for a hearty discussion of augmentative and alternative communication or AAC.  Whether high- or low-tech, these articles get at the tip of the iceberg when it comes to communication for non-vocal individuals.  And in Errata, Diana shares a wonderful email, Jackie tells us all how to make her pocket ethics charts, and Rob thanks you all for listening then demands iTunes reviews and Facebook likes so he can feel pretty.

Articles for next week:

Ganz, J.B. & Simpson, R.L.  (2004).  Effects on communicative requesting and speech development of the Picture Exchange Communication System in children with characteristics of autism.  Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 34, 395-409.  doi: 10.1023/B:JADD.0000037416.59095.d7

Gevarter, C., O'Reilly, M.F., Kuhn, M., Mills, K., Ferguson, R., Watkins, L., Sigafoos, J., Lang, R., Rojeski, L., & Lancioni, G.E.  (2016).  Increasing the vocalizations of individuals with autism during intervention with a speech-generating device.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 49, 17-33.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.270