Episode 85 - Observational Learning w/ Dr. Jackie MacDonald

The topics for “It’s Gonna Be May” keep on a-comin’ with Jackie’s award-winning work in observational learning research. Sure, we discuss some other articles about how important learning just by watching other people can be, but Jackie spends most of the episode thrilling us with tales of gluing toy boulders into trucks and the Cookie Man. Research sure sounds hard.

Articles discussed this episode:

MacDonald, J. & Ahearn, W.H.  (2015). Teaching observational learning to children with autism.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 48, 800-816.  doi:  10.1002/jaba.257

DeQuinzio, J.A. & Taylor, B.A.  (2015). Teaching children with autism to discriminate the reinforced and nonreinforced responses of others:  Implications for observational learning. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 48, 38-51.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.192

Townley-Cochran, D., Leaf, J.B., Taubman, M., Leaf, R., & McEachin, J.  (2015). Observational learning for students diagnosed with autism: A review paper.  Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2, 262-272.  doi: 10.1007/s40489-015-0050-0

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

May 2019 Preview

It’s gonna be MAAAAY! Technically, it’s May right now. And, in honor of May, all our episodes will be about ME! Well, about Diana and Jackie, to be exact. This month, we’ll be discussing research articles actually written by our dynamic doctor duo . There’s even an article that they wrote together. Plus, we finally dish out the answer to the question you’ve all been asking: What’s the difference between behavioral momentum and the high-p/low-p sequence? I mean, you might not be asking it overtly, but it’s at least a commonly occurring private event.

NOTE: Sorry about our busted audio this month. It was either use the poor quality back-up or a loud buzzing sound every 5 seconds. We’ll be back to normal next week.

Articles for May 2019

EIBI

MacDonald, R., Parry-Cruwys, D., Dupere, S., & Ahearn, W.  (2014). Assessing progress and outcome of early intensive behavioral intervention for toddlers with autism.  Research in Developmental Disabilities, 35, 3632-3644.  doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2014.08.036

Schreiman, L., Dawson, G., Stahmer, A.C., Landa, R., Rogers, S.J., McGee, G.G., Kasari, C., Ingersoll, B., Kaiser, A.P., Brinsma, Y., McNerney, E., Wetherby, A., & Halladay, A.  (2015). Naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions: Empirically validated treatments for autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45, 2411-2428.  doi: 10.1007/s10803-015-2407-8

Howard, J.S., Sparkman, C.R., Cohen, H.G., Green, G., & Stanislaw, H.  (2005). A comparison of intensive behavior analytic and eclectic treatments for young children with autism.  Research in Developmental Disabilities, 26, 359-383.  doi: 10.1016/j.ridd.2004.09.005

Observational Learning

MacDonald, J. & Ahearn, W.H.  (2015). Teaching observational learning to children with autism.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 48, 800-816.  doi:  10.1002/jaba.257

DeQuinzio, J.A. & Taylor, B.A.  (2015). Teaching children with autism to discriminate the reinforced and nonreinforced responses of others:  Implications for observational learning. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 48, 38-51.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.192

Townley-Cochran, D., Leaf, J.B., Taubman, M., Leaf, R., & McEachin, J.  (2015). Observational learning for students diagnosed with autism: A review paper.  Review Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 2, 262-272.  doi: 10.1007/s40489-015-0050-0


Behavioral Momentum

MacDonald, J.M., Ahearn, W.H., Parry-Cruwys, D., Bancroft, S., & Dube, W.V.  (2013). Persistence during extinction: Examining the effects of continuous and intermittent reinforcement on problem behavior.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 46, 333-338.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.3  

Parry-Cruwys, D.E., Neal, C.M., Ahearn, W.H., Wheeler, E.E., Premchander, R., Loeb, M.B., & Dube, W.V.  (2011). Resistance to disruption in a classroom setting. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 44, 363-367.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.2011.44-363

Nevin, J.A., Mandell, C., & Atak, J.R.  (1983). The analysis of behavioral momentum.  Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, 39, 49-59.  doi: 10.1901/jeab.1983.39-49  

Nevin, J.A.  (1996). The momentum of compliance.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 29, 535-547.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.1996.29-535

High-P/Low-P Sequence

Mace, F.C., Hock, M.L., Lalli, J.S., West, B.J., Belfiore, P., Pinter, E., & Brown, D.K.  (1988). Behavioral momentum in the treatment of noncompliance. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 21, 123-141.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.1988.21-123

Normand, M.P., Kestner, K., & Jessel, J.  (2010). An analysis of stimuli that influence compliance during the high-probability instruction sequence.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 43, 735-738.  doi; 10.1901/jaba.2010.43-735

Lipschultz, J. & Wilder, D.A.  (2017). Recent research on the high-probability instructional sequence: A brief review.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 50, 424-428.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.378

Zuluaga, C.A. & Normand, M.P.  (2008). An evaluation of the high-probability instruction sequence with and without programmed reinforcement for compliance with high-probability instructions.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 41, 453-457.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.2008.41-453

Nevin, J.A.  (1996). The momentum of compliance.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 29, 535-547.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.1996.29-535

Episode 81 - Healthy Food

Snacking sure is great. But, snacking isn’t usually the healthiest choice available. Since chiding people to eat better doesn’t seem to be cutting down the worldwide obesity epidemic, it looks like we’ll need behavior analysis to save the day. What does the research tell us about food preferences and promoting healthy food choices at a young age? And is there any way that we could make the whole thing some big, fun game? This podcast comes with and without cheese. You know you’re choosing the one with cheese.

Remember, all this April, a portion of CE processing fees will be donated to the New England Center for Children, a school for individuals with autism and a home of behavior analytic research and training. By applying for CEs from ABA Inside Track, you’ll be donating to a worthy cause. It’s win-win!

Articles discussed this episode:

Stark, L.J., Collins, Jr., F.L., Osnes, P.G., & Stokes, T.F. (1986). Using reinforcement and cueing to increase healthy snack food choices in preschoolers. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 19, 367-379. doi: 10.1901/jaba.1986.19-367

Zonneveld, K.L.M., Neidert, P.L., Dozier, C.L, Gureghian, D.L., & Bayles, M.W. (2019). Assessing factors that influence young children’s food preferences and choices. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 52, 240-257. doi: 10.1002/jaba.521

Jones, B.A., Madden, J.G., Wengreen, H.J., Aguilar, S.S., Desjardins, E.A. (2014). Gamification of dietary decision-making in an elementary-school cafeteria. PLoS ONE, 9, e93872. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093872

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

April 2019 Preview

Spring has sprung here at ABA Inside Track and a new garden of topics have grown into this months trio of podcasts. First, we take a look at what goes into making healthy food choices and how a space opera might be the key to battling obesity. Then we meet with special guest, Dr. Rocio Rosales, to discuss how to train individuals with ASD to improve job interview skills. Finally, we pull out the ol’ grab bag for another round of dog articles, good behavior games, and concurrent operant assessments.

Don’t forget, to celebrate Autism Awareness Month, all throughout April, a portion of proceeds from CE processing fees will be donated to the New England Center for Children, a globally acknowledged school for individuals with autism and a home of research and training in the field of behavior analysis. Pick up some CEs and donate to a worthy cause. It’s win-win!

Looking for exciting and educational behavior analytic conferences where you might run into ABA Inside Track hosts? Then don’t forget to check out the upcoming APBA Convention in Atlanta, GA on April 11-13, the BABAT Social in Natick, MA on April 25th (with guest speaker Diana!), and the ABAI Convention in Chicago, IL on May 23-27. Drop by and say “hi”.

Articles for April 2019:

Healthy Food

Stark, L.J., Collins, Jr., F.L., Osnes, P.G., & Stokes, T.F. (1986). Using reinforcement and cueing to increase healthy snack food choices in preschoolers. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 19, 367-379. doi: 10.1901/jaba.1986.19-367

Zonneveld, K.L.M., Neidert, P.L., Dozier, C.L, Gureghian, D.L., & Bayles, M.W. (2019). Assessing factors that influence young children’s food preferences and choices. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 52, 240-257. doi: 10.1002/jaba.521

Jones, B.A., Madden, J.G., Wengreen, H.J., Aguilar, S.S., Desjardins, E.A. (2014). Gamification of dietary decision-making in an elementary-school cafeteria. PLoS ONE, 9, e93872. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0093872

Interview Skills

O’Neill, J. & Rehfeldt, R.A. (2017). Computerized behavioral skills training with selection-based instruction and lag reinforcement schedules for responses to interview questions. Behavior Analysis: Research and Practice, 17, 42-54. doi: 10.1037/bar0000043

Smith, M.J., Ginger, E.J., Wright, K., Wright, M.A., Taylor, J.L., Humm, L.B., Olsen, D.E., Bell, M.D., & Fleming, M.F. (2014). Virtual reality job interview training in adults with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 44, 2450-2463. doi: 10.1007/s10803-014-2113-y

Stocco, C.S., Thompson, R.H., Hart, J.M., & Soriano, H.L. (2017). Improving the interview skills of college students using behavioral skills training. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 50, 495-510. doi: 10.1002/jaba.385

Rosales, R. & Whitlow, H. (2019). A component analysis of job interview training for young adults with autism spectrum disorder. Behavioral Interventions, 1-16. doi: 10.1002/bin.1658

Grab Bag VII

Robinson, E.S., Desrochers, M., & Napolitano, D.A. (2019). Concurrent operant preference assessment to identify social consequences to decrease task latency for adolescents with dual diagnosis. Behavioral Interventions, 34, 52-61. doi: 10.1002/bin.1648

Groves, E.A. & Austin, J.L. (2019). Does the good behavior game evoke negative peer pressure? Analyses in primary and secondary classrooms. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 52, 3-16. doi: 10.1002/jaba.513

Tyner, S., Brewer, A., Helman, M., Leon, Y., Pritchard, J., & Schulnd, M. (2016). Nice doggie! Contact desensitization plue reinforcement decreases dog phobias for children with autism. Behavior Analysis in Practice, 9, 54-57. doi: 10.1007/s40617-016-0113-4

Episode 73 - General-Case Analysis

So, you learned a new skill. That’s great! But can you use that skill over here? How about here? What about with these items? If you said no, perhaps you’d be interested in hearing all about general-case analysis, a nifty classic technique that provides all the handy-dandy steps you need to promote amazing response generalization. Plus, we remember that cigarette machines used to be a thing.

Articles discussed this episode:

Chadsey-Rusch, J., Drasgow, E., Reinoehl, B., Halle, J., & Collet-Klingenberg, L. (1993). Using general-case instruction to teach spontaneous and generalized requests for assistance to learners with severe disabilities. Journal of the Association for Persons with Severe Handicaps, 18, 177-187. doi:10.1177/154079699301800304

Sprague, J.R. & Horner, R.H. (1984). The effects of single instance, multiple instance, and general case training on generalized vending machine use by moderately and severely handicapped students. Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 17, 273-278. doi: 10.1901/jaba.1984.17-273

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 62 - Help, I Need Somebody

This week, we're discussing asking for help and ways to improve this important life skill.  We discuss basic requests for help, how to prevent overgeneralization of the response, and high- and low-tech solutions for asking for help when lost.  Plus, Rob goes out of his way to make the absolute worst jokes possible in a feeble attempt to lighten the mood.

Articles discussed this episode:

Rodriguez, N.M., Levesque, M.A., Cohrs, V.L., & Niemeier, J.J.  (2017).  Teaching children with autism to request help with difficult tasks.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 50, 717-732.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.420

Carlile, K.A., DeBar, R.M., Reeve, S.A., Reeve, K.F., & Meyer, L.S.  (2018).  Teaching help-seeking when lost to individuals with autism spectrum disorder.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 51, 191-206.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.447

If you're interested in ordering CEs for listening to this episode, click here to go to the store page. You'll need to enter your name, BCBA #, and the two episode secret code words to complete the purchase. Email us at abainsidetrack@gmail.com for further assistance.

Episode 62 Preview

No one makes it through this crazy world alone.  Whether a full-grown adult or a child with disabilities, everyone needs to be able to ask for help once in a while.  But what happens when you keep asking for help all the time? Or your need help but don't know who to ask or where you are? Next week we'll be reviewing articles that have the answers to the these questions.  But first, a whole bunch of upcoming episode and appearance reminders!

Articles for next episode:

Rodriguez, N.M., Levesque, M.A., Cohrs, V.L., & Niemeier, J.J.  (2017).  Teaching children with autism to request help with difficult tasks.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 50, 717-732.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.420

Carlile, K.A., DeBar, R.M., Reeve, S.A., Reeve, K.F., & Meyer, L.S.  (2018).  Teaching help-seeking when lost to individuals with autism spectrum disorder.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 51, 191-206.  doi: 10.1002/jaba.447

Episode 49 Preview

::RING RING:: Hello, we know you're out there.  We can feel you now.  We know that you're afraid.  You're afraid of efficient teaching methodology.  I don't know the future.  I didn't come here to tell you how to train individual exemplars.  I came here to tell you about matrix training.  I'm going to hang up this phone, and then I'm going to podcast to BCBAs what you don't want them to hear.  I'm going to tell them about a world of recombinative generalization, a world taught along the diagonal, a world where anything is possible.  Where we go from there is a choice I leave to you.  ::CUE RAGE AGAINST THE MACHINE::

Articles for next week:

Axe, J.B. & Sainato, D.M.  (2010).  Matrix training of preliteracy skills with preschoolers with autism.  Journal of Applied Behavior Analysis, 43, 635-652.  doi: 10.1901/jaba.2010.43-635

MacManus, C., MacDonald, R., & Ahearn, W.H.  (2015).  Teaching and generalizing pretend play in children with autism using video modeling and matrix training.  Behavioral Interventions, 30, 191-218.  doi: 10.1002/bin.1406